I Was A Stranger – You Welcomed Me

There are countless opportunities for workers in America to love and serve our new neighbors. What is needed are open eyes, a servant heart, and the courage to engage with people who at first seem very different.

The number of people on the move internationally is greater than ever before. We live in the age of migration. You’ve probably seen evidence of America’s changing face in your own city or neighborhood.

Many people are coming from parts of the world least reached by the gospel, representing over eighty different unreached people groups. Our neighborhoods are becoming home to the very people missionaries are working to reach around the world.

Fulfilling the Great Commission has traditionally meant living in another country, learning a new language and culture, and overcoming being the outsider as you make relationships for sharing the gospel.

Sean & Sunny: “When we were first approached by World Team to consider pursuing involvement with The INN in Chicago, we first thought we would be working with Syrian refugees.  Little did we know then that God had bigger plans.

Our research brought us to a neighborhood where we found tens of thousands of people, most of whom are from South Asia; people from Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, as well as others from the Middle East – Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran and Syria.  These are people who love to discuss their (Muslim, Hindu, or Buddhist) faith, and who are open to discussing spiritual matters.

When coupled with the understanding that Muslims have been coming to faith in Christ like never before in history, there is an incredible opportunity to reach out to share the love, grace and truth of Christ with those whom we, as people from the US, would not normally be able to reach in their home countries.  This is happening throughout the US, and not just in Chicago!”

Today the nations are coming to our doorstep. The diaspora (people who have moved from their homeland) may already speak English, and they probably want help learning more. They need help with logistics, learning our cultural norms, and settling their families into our communities. Often they are more open-minded and willing to learn about our faith and beliefs.

There are countless opportunities for workers in America to love and serve our new neighbors. What is needed are open eyes, a servant heart, and the courage to engage with people who at first seem very different.

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